cumberbatchweb:

As some people had asked here’s the full article from yesterday’s Times on the Stand up to Cancer campaign which Benedict has been photographed for.

I’ve also included all the images in case people are interested (hello Tom Hardy!)

Photos by Greg Williams.

When the photographer Greg Williams took these pictures, he was looking for one thing: urgency. Gillian Anderson flung off her heels and ran barefoot along the pavement; Idris Elba bolted down a London street; Steve Coogan leapt over a hedge. It was all in aid of the Stand Up To Cancer campaign, which launches this autumn.

Williams lost his mother to ovarian cancer in 2008, after three relapses that spanned 19 years. For this project he asked his subjects to sprint towards him “as fast as they can, as if trying to save a life”.

The first person Williams enlisted was his good friend, the actor Tom Hardy, who charged down the road near his house in a dressing gown and boxer shorts. The idea was that, “He could have just been making his breakfast at home and then suddenly it’s this mad call to arms. He drops everything and the most important thing in the world is saving that life,” says Williams.

Other stars soon came forward to support the campaign. Benedict Cumberbatch, Eddie Redmayne and Anna Friel all took part in a bid to increase awareness. “The quicker we move, the faster we can find cures and help people,” says Williams. “It makes perfect sense really.”

Stand Up To Cancer is a joint national fundraising campaign from Cancer Research UK and Channel 4 (standuptocancer.org.uk)


    I’m watching Girls



“Finishing Season 3.”



    
    
        Check-in to
    
    
    Girls on tvtag

I’m watching Girls

“Finishing Season 3.”

Check-in to Girls on tvtag

Interviewer: “On another note, I wanted to congratulate you on your Emmy win… I know you didn’t get a chance to give a speech, so I was going to give you the opportunity to do it now, if you would like.” (x)

Oh Benny.. [x]

lordshezza:

#HQ - Benedict Cumberbatch attends the Variety Studio presented by Moroccanoil at Holt Renfrew during the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival on September 8, 2014 in Toronto, Canada

benedict-cumberbatch-gifs:

How did you channel your inner gay?

[x]

His answer is cut out for editing reasons, but check out his full answer in the linked video. 

I don’t think I know who the Doctor is anymore.” 

algrenion:

colinfrth:

myrdas:

colinfrth:

Behind the Scenes of “All About That Bass” +

How are skinny girls supposed to feel love when your song is about loving only fat bodies?

I’m sorry, but how are fat girls supposed to feel when every advertisement, be it on television or in a magazine, when nearly every movie, shows only thin women? I am completely against body shaming, but the fact remains that there is very little positive representation for bigger girls. Thin women are considered the norm and are far more accepted and you see them everywhere you look in the media. So please, don’t take this the wrong way, but please just let me have a song that makes me, for once, feel good about my body.

ive also noticed that people always focus on one particular line of this song which apparently makes it “skinny shaming”

image

but nobody ever acknowledges the following lines?

image

the main theme of the song is giving love to larger women because larger women are so commonly shamed for their bodies, ignored by the media and generally given less love and acceptance than thinner women, but the song in its entirety is a message that all women are beautiful. People are failing to acknowledge that

womenwhokickass:

Dr. Mae Jemison: Why she kicks ass
A Chemical engineer, scientist, physician, teacher and astronaut, Dr. Mae Jemison has a wide knowledge of technology, engineering, and medical research. 
In addition to her extensive background in science, she is versed in African and African-American Studies, speaks fluent Russian, Japanese, and Swahili, as well as English and is trained in dance and choreography.
On June 4, 1987, she became the first African American woman ever admitted into the astronaut training program. 
On September 12, 1992, Jemison finally flew into space with six other astronauts aboard the Endeavour on mission STS47, marking her as the first African American woman ever to be a U.S. astronaut. 
She also established the Jemison Group, a company that seeks to research, develop, and market advanced technologies.

womenwhokickass:

Dr. Mae Jemison: Why she kicks ass

  • A Chemical engineer, scientist, physician, teacher and astronaut, Dr. Mae Jemison has a wide knowledge of technology, engineering, and medical research. 
  • In addition to her extensive background in science, she is versed in African and African-American Studies, speaks fluent Russian, Japanese, and Swahili, as well as English and is trained in dance and choreography.
  • On June 4, 1987, she became the first African American woman ever admitted into the astronaut training program. 
  • On September 12, 1992, Jemison finally flew into space with six other astronauts aboard the Endeavour on mission STS47, marking her as the first African American woman ever to be a U.S. astronaut. 
  • She also established the Jemison Group, a company that seeks to research, develop, and market advanced technologies.
sciencesoup:

Badass Scientist of the Week: Mae Jemison
Born in 1956 to a maintenance worker and a teacher, Mae Jemison graduated high school at sixteen and went on to simultaneously earn a BS in Chemical Engineering and a BA in African-American Studies from Stanford University. She studied medicine at Cornell, during which she travelled to Cuba, Kenya and Thailand to provide medical care, then served as a medical officer in the Peace Corps from 1983–1985 in Sierra Leone and West Africa, where she researched Hepatitis B, schistosomaisis and rabies vaccines. After returning to the US, Jemison enrolled in graduate engineering classes and applied to NASA’s astronaut program. Her first application was turned down, but in 1987 she was chosen as one of fifteen candidates out of 2,000 applicants. In 1992, she became a co-investigator on bone cell research on the shuttle Endeavour (STS-47 Spacelab-J), a cooperative mission between the US and Japan. The mission lasted eight days—Jemison logged 190 hours, 30 minutes, 23 seconds in space, making her the first female African-American astronaut. Oh, and she’s also fluent in Russian, Japanese and Swahili, she’s trained in dance and choreography, and she was the first real astronaut to appear on Star Trek in 1993.

sciencesoup:

Badass Scientist of the Week: Mae Jemison

Born in 1956 to a maintenance worker and a teacher, Mae Jemison graduated high school at sixteen and went on to simultaneously earn a BS in Chemical Engineering and a BA in African-American Studies from Stanford University. She studied medicine at Cornell, during which she travelled to Cuba, Kenya and Thailand to provide medical care, then served as a medical officer in the Peace Corps from 1983–1985 in Sierra Leone and West Africa, where she researched Hepatitis B, schistosomaisis and rabies vaccines. After returning to the US, Jemison enrolled in graduate engineering classes and applied to NASA’s astronaut program. Her first application was turned down, but in 1987 she was chosen as one of fifteen candidates out of 2,000 applicants. In 1992, she became a co-investigator on bone cell research on the shuttle Endeavour (STS-47 Spacelab-J), a cooperative mission between the US and Japan. The mission lasted eight days—Jemison logged 190 hours, 30 minutes, 23 seconds in space, making her the first female African-American astronaut. Oh, and she’s also fluent in Russian, Japanese and Swahili, she’s trained in dance and choreography, and she was the first real astronaut to appear on Star Trek in 1993.